Just like the 90’s was the Big Mac generation, we are definitely the Open Source generation. More startups in the mid 2000’s were built on top of Open Source technologies than ever before. Most of these companies grew into becoming some of the largest IT enterprises in the world. Obviously I don’t need to name the companies I am thinking about, but just because I like to name drop… Think about Facebook, Google and Netflix, just as a start. But what is this post about? It’s about the question… Do you want fries with that? Or will you be boiling your own…

I spend an exuberant amount of time working inside terminals and using ssh to manage remote servers. They range from the default terminal interface shipped with Linux, to the more outrageous OSX Based iTerm2. It’s safe to say that because of this, I have spent much of my time customizing the way my terminals react and display information as well as store my SSH keys for easy authentication. In this BLOG post I will discuss the terminals I use and the different settings I invoke to make my time spent in them, more pleasurable. I’ll also take a look at how to make SSH keys available across terminal sessions.

Every year in December my family and I go to a small coastal town in the Western Cape. It’s a wonderful little town and the weather is perfect for what you would expect from a South African Summer Holiday, but there is one small problem… No proper internet. Being the tech-head in the family, I was once again turned to, to solve the problem. Luckilly I had a Raspberry Pi, D-Link USB Wifi Adapter and Huawei 3G Dongle in my laptop bag…

On a daily basis I get faced with interesting problems for which I need to find simple and elegant solutions. The problem though is that these solutions need to work across a large, very diverse, set of environments. So I can’t rely on languages like Ruby or Python to always solve my problems, because, the truth is, the environment in which the solution needs to work might not have it installed. But there is one thing, a common denominator across almost all Linux environments that I can comfortably rely on.

BASH!

Every so often I get asked to write an article on a certain specific subject. I am a bit ashamed to admit that I very rarely respond to those requests and outside of work where I am somewhat required to submit technical documentation, I don’t get around to writing about my interesting exploits in the world of tech.

Hopefully, this blog will be the beginning of an era where I actually get around to vocalising my daily exploits on a more regular basis. So to kick off my new blog, I’ll write a short article about OctoPress, how to set it up and why I decided to go with a statically generated blog as apposed to something like WordPress…